Social Icons

Chủ Nhật, 30 tháng 11, 2014

SAP marks 25 years in Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

Coal conversion plants sap China's emissions targets - Financial Times

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


Chinese negotiators attending this week’s climate change talks in Lima have come armed with a long and detailed list of measures to rein in the coal use that creates smog at home and climate change worries abroad.


Early this month President Xi Jinping unveiled an estimate that China’s greenhouse gases would stop climbing in about 2030, thanks to policies restricting coal use around big cities in the east.


But there’s a wild card in the carefully tabulated spreadsheets of boilers to be shut and pipes to be laid. Emissions from an industry that transforms coal into gas or liquid fuel are proving difficult to measure and could undermine the country’s greenhouse gas projections.


Plants that transform coal into automotive fuel, chemicals or gas – by steaming the fossil fuel under pressure – are mushrooming in the grasslands along the edge of the Gobi desert and in ethnically divided towns in northern Xinjiang.


Nobody knows how many may ultimately be built, nor how much emissions they will produce. But what is clear is that they guzzle water, a scarce commodity, and produce clouds of greenhouse gases. By some estimates, emissions from the coal-to-chemicals plants in the pipeline could add up to between 4 per cent and 11 per cent of China’s current emissions.


Giving the green light to powerful state-owned energy firms to invest in these large and expensive projects in the frontier has made it easier for Beijing to win support for coal use restrictions in the east. Senior advisers are divided over the wisdom of that trade-off.


Coal-to-gas projects’ heavy toll on water and coal resources means “it is not the way to go, in my opinion,” Du Xiangwan, one of the senior scientists who help shape Chinese policy, said at a recent conference, shooting a pointed look at coal conversion backers in the rows of honoured guests.


The role of these projects is key. China uses half the world’s coal and accurate projections of its consumption are essential to understanding how much more carbon humans are likely to pump into the atmosphere.


China’s announcement that emissions are likely to reach their highest point in about 2030 leaves open the likelihood that coal use will grow steeply in some regions while it gradually eases off in others. As Li Shuo, climate and energy policy campaigner for Greenpeace, puts it: “We know when we will see the summit, but we don’t know what the contours of this mountain will be.”



Greenpeace estimates that 18 coal-to-gas projects are under construction or in advanced planning, out of a total 54 on the drawing board which may or may not come to fruition. They would contribute nearly 400m tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere every year, equivalent to 4 per cent of China’s total carbon emissions in 2013.


Some of those 18 are included in a list of 27 coal to oil, gas or petrochemicals projects the National Development and Reform Commission, China’s state planning agency, counts as going forward. Others are floundering economically and technically. Compounding the confusion, at least one operating coal-to-ethylene plant does not appear on the NDRC list.



Energy industry insiders dismiss alarms over the large pipeline of projects, saying that most will not prove viable. In the past decade, 284 coal-to-chemicals projects have been tendered, according to an engineering website tracking the projects. Most have not been completed, due to policy shifts or lack of profitability. Coal conversion dropped off China’s latest “encouraged” investment list.


“You won’t see too fast development. There will be modest development,” says Yang Hongwei, energy efficiency expert at the NDRC. Water concerns mean the NDRC will restrict plants from “just sprouting up”.


Yang Fuqiang, senior adviser to the Natural Resources Defense Council, adds: “If you look at the total social cost coal-to-chemicals is uncompetitive.”


Besides, China has been here before and Beijing was quick to stamp it out, in 2008, over concerns about scarcity of water. Many assume it will step in again to quell the current enthusiasm.


Additional reporting by Owen Guo



Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2014. You may share using our article tools.

Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.






Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP marks 25 years in Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

Coal conversion plants sap China's emissions targets - Financial Times

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


Chinese negotiators attending this week’s climate change talks in Lima have come armed with a long and detailed list of measures to rein in the coal use that creates smog at home and climate change worries abroad.


Early this month President Xi Jinping unveiled an estimate that China’s greenhouse gases would stop climbing in about 2030, thanks to policies restricting coal use around big cities in the east.


But there’s a wild card in the carefully tabulated spreadsheets of boilers to be shut and pipes to be laid. Emissions from an industry that transforms coal into gas or liquid fuel are proving difficult to measure and could undermine the country’s greenhouse gas projections.


Plants that transform coal into automotive fuel, chemicals or gas – by steaming the fossil fuel under pressure – are mushrooming in the grasslands along the edge of the Gobi desert and in ethnically divided towns in northern Xinjiang.


Nobody knows how many may ultimately be built, nor how much emissions they will produce. But what is clear is that they guzzle water, a scarce commodity, and produce clouds of greenhouse gases. By some estimates, emissions from the coal-to-chemicals plants in the pipeline could add up to between 4 per cent and 11 per cent of China’s current emissions.


Giving the green light to powerful state-owned energy firms to invest in these large and expensive projects in the frontier has made it easier for Beijing to win support for coal use restrictions in the east. Senior advisers are divided over the wisdom of that trade-off.


Coal-to-gas projects’ heavy toll on water and coal resources means “it is not the way to go, in my opinion,” Du Xiangwan, one of the senior scientists who help shape Chinese policy, said at a recent conference, shooting a pointed look at coal conversion backers in the rows of honoured guests.


The role of these projects is key. China uses half the world’s coal and accurate projections of its consumption are essential to understanding how much more carbon humans are likely to pump into the atmosphere.


China’s announcement that emissions are likely to reach their highest point in about 2030 leaves open the likelihood that coal use will grow steeply in some regions while it gradually eases off in others. As Li Shuo, climate and energy policy campaigner for Greenpeace, puts it: “We know when we will see the summit, but we don’t know what the contours of this mountain will be.”



Greenpeace estimates that 18 coal-to-gas projects are under construction or in advanced planning, out of a total 54 on the drawing board which may or may not come to fruition. They would contribute nearly 400m tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere every year, equivalent to 4 per cent of China’s total carbon emissions in 2013.


Some of those 18 are included in a list of 27 coal to oil, gas or petrochemicals projects the National Development and Reform Commission, China’s state planning agency, counts as going forward. Others are floundering economically and technically. Compounding the confusion, at least one operating coal-to-ethylene plant does not appear on the NDRC list.



Energy industry insiders dismiss alarms over the large pipeline of projects, saying that most will not prove viable. In the past decade, 284 coal-to-chemicals projects have been tendered, according to an engineering website tracking the projects. Most have not been completed, due to policy shifts or lack of profitability. Coal conversion dropped off China’s latest “encouraged” investment list.


“You won’t see too fast development. There will be modest development,” says Yang Hongwei, energy efficiency expert at the NDRC. Water concerns mean the NDRC will restrict plants from “just sprouting up”.


Yang Fuqiang, senior adviser to the Natural Resources Defense Council, adds: “If you look at the total social cost coal-to-chemicals is uncompetitive.”


Besides, China has been here before and Beijing was quick to stamp it out, in 2008, over concerns about scarcity of water. Many assume it will step in again to quell the current enthusiasm.


Additional reporting by Owen Guo



Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2014. You may share using our article tools.

Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.






Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP marks 25 years Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

Coal conversion plants sap China's emissions targets - Financial Times

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


Chinese negotiators attending this week’s climate change talks in Lima have come armed with a long and detailed list of measures to rein in the coal use that creates smog at home and climate change worries abroad.


Early this month President Xi Jinping unveiled an estimate that China’s greenhouse gases would stop climbing in about 2030, thanks to policies restricting coal use around big cities in the east.


But there’s a wild card in the carefully tabulated spreadsheets of boilers to be shut and pipes to be laid. Emissions from an industry that transforms coal into gas or liquid fuel are proving difficult to measure and could undermine the country’s greenhouse gas projections.


Plants that transform coal into automotive fuel, chemicals or gas – by steaming the fossil fuel under pressure – are mushrooming in the grasslands along the edge of the Gobi desert and in ethnically divided towns in northern Xinjiang.


Nobody knows how many may ultimately be built, nor how much emissions they will produce. But what is clear is that they guzzle water, a scarce commodity, and produce clouds of greenhouse gases. By some estimates, emissions from the coal-to-chemicals plants in the pipeline could add up to between 4 per cent and 11 per cent of China’s current emissions.


Giving the green light to powerful state-owned energy firms to invest in these large and expensive projects in the frontier has made it easier for Beijing to win support for coal use restrictions in the east. Senior advisers are divided over the wisdom of that trade-off.


Coal-to-gas projects’ heavy toll on water and coal resources means “it is not the way to go, in my opinion,” Du Xiangwan, one of the senior scientists who help shape Chinese policy, said at a recent conference, shooting a pointed look at coal conversion backers in the rows of honoured guests.


The role of these projects is key. China uses half the world’s coal and accurate projections of its consumption are essential to understanding how much more carbon humans are likely to pump into the atmosphere.


China’s announcement that emissions are likely to reach their highest point in about 2030 leaves open the likelihood that coal use will grow steeply in some regions while it gradually eases off in others. As Li Shuo, climate and energy policy campaigner for Greenpeace, puts it: “We know when we will see the summit, but we don’t know what the contours of this mountain will be.”


Greenpeace estimates that 18 coal-to-gas projects are under construction or in advanced planning, out of a total 54 on the drawing board which may or may not come to fruition. They would contribute nearly 400m tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere every year, equivalent to 4 per cent of China’s total carbon emissions in 2013.


China's coal consumption


Some of those 18 are included in a list of 27 coal to oil, gas or petrochemicals projects the National Development and Reform Commission, China’s state planning agency, counts as going forward. Others are floundering economically and technically. Compounding the confusion, at least one operating coal-to-ethylene plant does not appear on the NDRC list.


Energy industry insiders dismiss alarms over the large pipeline of projects, saying that most will not prove viable. In the past decade, 284 coal-to-chemicals projects have been tendered, according to an engineering website tracking the projects. Most have not been completed, due to policy shifts or lack of profitability. Coal conversion dropped off China’s latest “encouraged” investment list.


“You won’t see too fast development. There will be modest development,” says Yang Hongwei, energy efficiency expert at the NDRC. Water concerns mean the NDRC will restrict plants from “just sprouting up”.


Yang Fuqiang, senior adviser to the Natural Resources Defense Council, adds: “If you look at the total social cost coal-to-chemicals is uncompetitive.”


Besides, China has been here before and Beijing was quick to stamp it out, in 2008, over concerns about scarcity of water. Many assume it will step in again to quell the current enthusiasm.


Additional reporting by Owen Guo



Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2014. You may share using our article tools.

Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.






Subribe Sap Feeds

Book review: SAP Nation – a runaway software economy - Diginomica

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News




diginomica


business insights for the digital enterprise





Copyright diginomica Ltd 2013-14, Created under Creative Commons License, some rights reserved








Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP marks 25 years Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

Book review: SAP Nation – a runaway software economy - Diginomica

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News




diginomica


business insights for the digital enterprise





Copyright diginomica Ltd 2013-14, Created under Creative Commons License, some rights reserved








Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP marks 25 years Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

Why HP, Wipro and SAP scouting for enterprise mobility specialists - Economic Times

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


Nov 28, 2014, 02.55PM IST







(This is because companies…)




By Amrita Premrajan, TimesJobs.com Bureau


Are you a software developer with hands-on experience in mobile app development on various platforms like Android, iOS or Windows? Did you know that large technology solution providers are looking out for you? Here is why:


According to IDC, the Indian enterprise mobility market is set to grow at a CAGR of 63 per cent and hit $1.8 billion by 2017. If you are a techie with sound experience in mobile app development then you can look at claiming a share of this pie!





This is because companies like HP, Wipro and SAP are scouting for mobility specialists like you, in a bid to strengthen their enterprise mobility offerings.

Demand for mobility specialists


Changing workforce practices: Today, the nature of workforce is evolving into a mix of desk workers, part time workers, virtual workers and on-the-move workforce.

One common demand from all of them is the need for quick access to enterprise apps such as ERP, CRM, business intelligence, analytics and more.

Business needs: To enable efficient working of different kinds of workforce, organisations are experiencing a strong business need to make core enterprise apps available via different mobile device platforms.


Business opportunity


Tech product companies and IT consulting companies are gauging this need and actively working on building enterprise mobility products and solutions.

A deep dive into the TimesJobs.com data highlights that tech solution providers such as HP, Wipro, HoneyWell, SAP, Happiest Minds, IBM, Teradata and Riverbed are currently in a hiring spree for mobility specialists.


Mobility profiles in demand


Tapping the TimesJobs.com data, we bring you the top mobility related profiles which are in demand within these companies.


For all these three enterprise mobility profiles, there are two common traits that the industry is demanding from them:


* Hands-on experience in programming of mobile apps and debugging skills * Educational background ranges from BCA, MCA to BTech but emphasis is primarily on hands-on experience in mobile app ecosystem


1) Tech Lead (Mobile Apps)


Job role: Managing a team of analysts, mobile app developers, testers and engineers and drive delivery of the product


Experience: 5+ years in software or product development


*Experience in software product life cycle development from concept to deployment *Strong hands-on experience in mobile and tablet app development using Google Android SDK and iOS and other smartphone devices *Capable of defining software architecture and design using design patterns, UML and object oriented concepts *Strong problem solving and analytical capabilities


2) Solution Architect - Mobile Apps/Mobility architect


Job description: Architecting and implementing enterprise mobility apps


Experience: 4-5+ years in software development with at least 2 years experience in development on mobile platforms (Android/iOS)

* Experience in writing code using languages such as (and not limited to) COBOL, PL/1, Java, C, C++, C#, VB.Net * Basic understanding of RDBMS databases such SQL Server and Oracle * Knowledge of iOS Human Interface Guideline, Android UI Design and Windows Phone Guidelines for smartphones and tablets * Experience of full mobile software development life cycle gathering requirements, software architecture, design, coding, integration and testing

3) Test Lead - Mobile App


Job description: Leading mobile app testing for various mobile platforms for functionality, usability, performance and security aspects in an agile project environment


Experience: 5+ years in software quality assurance, end to end functional and regression testing




* Hands-on experience on test automation tools like Selenium, Test Complete, Calabash, Appium or equivalent tools * Ability to plan for automation, script test cases and manage the test suites using industry standard tools * Understanding of applying quality assurance fundamentals, QA processes and the complete QA life cycle







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP marks 25 years Australia - iTWire

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


It was out of Germany, and it specialised in something called ERP – enterprise resource planning, which was also something many people had never heard of.


Now SAP is the third largest software company on earth, after Microsoft and Oracle, and people certainly have heard of it. It is in fact so dominant at the high end of the ERP market that it seems to be the company that everybody targets.


It was not that way 25 years ago. It is hard now to remember what the IT scene was like in 1989. The decade that was ending was marked by the PC revolution, but mainframes and minicomputers still ruled the corporate world.


The big computer companies were the hardware and systems vendors – IBM and its look-alike competitors Amdahl, HDS and Fujitsu. Digital Equipment Corporation was a clear number two. There was HP, still called Hewlett-Packard in those days. And companies like Data General, Prime, and Wang.


In 1989 Bob Hawke was still Prime Minister and the World Wide Web hadn’t been invented. Mobile phones didn’t exist. We watched TV when the broadcasters told us to, and they told us what to watch.


Much software was still custom written, but packaged software was becoming more popular. A dozen or more vendors competed for what was increasingly being called ERP - a new way of doing things in corporate IT.


ERP was a catch-all phrase that described the software used by large organisations – enterprises – to manage their core applications.. The term grew out of the manufacturing industry, but was increasingly being used to describe any mission critical software that looked after an enterprise’s finances and day to day operations.


SAP (from the German Systeme, Anwendungen und Produkte – Systems, Applications and Products) was founded in Germany in 1972 specifically to design software for large corporations. By the late 1980s it had become very successful in Europe, and it expanded into Asia. Largely to support the operations of European users of the software that also had operations in this part of the world.


The largest Australian user at that time was oil company Shell, but shortly after arriving in Australia in 1989 SAP landed a major contract with Medibank, which was the first time many people had heard of the company. It was in the right place at the right time, and rode the ERP boom of the 90s in Australia as it did around the world.


Now SAP has celebrated 25 years in Australia and Asia. It is expanding its Innovation Centre in Singapore, which it says is focussed on delivering innovations around smart cities, healthcare and digital consumers. SAP is moving way beyond ERP.


“This involves co-innovation with SAP customers and partners as well as research collaboration with local universities,” says Adaire Fox-Martin, head of SAP in the Asia Pacific region. “Asia Pacific is-growing quickly. We are now entering the era of Internet of Things with the rapid growth of smart, connected devices and systems to meet the changing demands of today’s consumers.


“As we embrace a networked, technology-driven innovative economy, we will focus on accelerating industry growth in public services, healthcare, financial services and retail,” she said. “Building on our 25-year presence in the region, we look forward to continued commitment and close collaboration with customers, partners, governments and universities throughout Asia Pacific, to drive innovation and skills development.”


Fox-Martin said SAP is also tapping into the IT ecosystem across the region to identify ideas at an early stage and leverage access to a large pool of the brightest young talent. Under the SAP University Alliances Student Entrepreneurship program, students can develop new applications across SAP’s technologies, leveraging SAP’s HANA in-memory database and the the SAP mobile platform and analytics capabilities.


“The students will gain access to these technologies, SAP experts, mentors and an entrepreneurship curriculum.” Launched globally in March, the student entrepreneurship program has now been extended to Australia, Singapore and India. It will be introduced in Japan and Korea later this year.


SAP says it is now much more than an ERP vendor. Its Singapore Innovation Centre, and other initiatives such as its new Institute for Digital Governance in Canberra, are signs of a company playing for a much larger role.


Disclosure: Graeme Philipson visited Singapore as a guest of SAP







Subribe Sap Feeds

Why HP, Wipro and SAP scouting for enterprise mobility specialists - Economic Times

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


Nov 28, 2014, 02.55PM IST







(This is because companies…)




By Amrita Premrajan, TimesJobs.com Bureau


Are you a software developer with hands-on experience in mobile app development on various platforms like Android, iOS or Windows? Did you know that large technology solution providers are looking out for you? Here is why:


According to IDC, the Indian enterprise mobility market is set to grow at a CAGR of 63 per cent and hit $1.8 billion by 2017. If you are a techie with sound experience in mobile app development then you can look at claiming a share of this pie!





This is because companies like HP, Wipro and SAP are scouting for mobility specialists like you, in a bid to strengthen their enterprise mobility offerings.

Demand for mobility specialists


Changing workforce practices: Today, the nature of workforce is evolving into a mix of desk workers, part time workers, virtual workers and on-the-move workforce.

One common demand from all of them is the need for quick access to enterprise apps such as ERP, CRM, business intelligence, analytics and more.

Business needs: To enable efficient working of different kinds of workforce, organisations are experiencing a strong business need to make core enterprise apps available via different mobile device platforms.


Business opportunity


Tech product companies and IT consulting companies are gauging this need and actively working on building enterprise mobility products and solutions.

A deep dive into the TimesJobs.com data highlights that tech solution providers such as HP, Wipro, HoneyWell, SAP, Happiest Minds, IBM, Teradata and Riverbed are currently in a hiring spree for mobility specialists.


Mobility profiles in demand


Tapping the TimesJobs.com data, we bring you the top mobility related profiles which are in demand within these companies.


For all these three enterprise mobility profiles, there are two common traits that the industry is demanding from them:


* Hands-on experience in programming of mobile apps and debugging skills * Educational background ranges from BCA, MCA to BTech but emphasis is primarily on hands-on experience in mobile app ecosystem


1) Tech Lead (Mobile Apps)


Job role: Managing a team of analysts, mobile app developers, testers and engineers and drive delivery of the product


Experience: 5+ years in software or product development


*Experience in software product life cycle development from concept to deployment *Strong hands-on experience in mobile and tablet app development using Google Android SDK and iOS and other smartphone devices *Capable of defining software architecture and design using design patterns, UML and object oriented concepts *Strong problem solving and analytical capabilities


2) Solution Architect - Mobile Apps/Mobility architect


Job description: Architecting and implementing enterprise mobility apps


Experience: 4-5+ years in software development with at least 2 years experience in development on mobile platforms (Android/iOS)

* Experience in writing code using languages such as (and not limited to) COBOL, PL/1, Java, C, C++, C#, VB.Net * Basic understanding of RDBMS databases such SQL Server and Oracle * Knowledge of iOS Human Interface Guideline, Android UI Design and Windows Phone Guidelines for smartphones and tablets * Experience of full mobile software development life cycle gathering requirements, software architecture, design, coding, integration and testing

3) Test Lead - Mobile App


Job description: Leading mobile app testing for various mobile platforms for functionality, usability, performance and security aspects in an agile project environment


Experience: 5+ years in software quality assurance, end to end functional and regression testing




* Hands-on experience on test automation tools like Selenium, Test Complete, Calabash, Appium or equivalent tools * Ability to plan for automation, script test cases and manage the test suites using industry standard tools * Understanding of applying quality assurance fundamentals, QA processes and the complete QA life cycle







Subribe Sap Feeds

SAP Customers Seek Unified 'Cloud Architecture' - Wall Street Journal (blog)

@ a< href="http://sap.rssfeeds.pw">Sap RSS News


CIO customers of SAP SE ’s cloud software say they would like to see the company consolidate its various applications onto a common architecture. The CIOs tell CIO Journal that consolidation would make it easier for SAP to upgrade the software, reducing potential disruption to their own businesses.


SAP CEO Bill McDermott said, in an interview with Re/Code published Monday, that the German software maker will outline a five-year plan for its business expansion, including a drill-down into its cloud strategy. Broadstrokes for the plan will emerge in January, when the company reports its quarterly results, with more details coming at a February shareholders meeting.


What SAP shares will be critical; the company has waded into the cloud market by spending about $16 billion on acquiring commerce software maker Ariba, human resources concern SuccessFactors and, most recently, corporate travel management firm Concur Technologies Inc. It’s also building versions of its on-premises financial and procurement applications that run in the cloud.


John Hill, CIO of industrial conveyor belt maker Veyance Technologies Inc., said SAP could make CIOs’ lives easier with a unified “cloud architecture.” The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. subsidiary uses SAP’s enterprise resource planning software as well as Concur. Mr. Hill says a unified architecture would help SAP rapidly deploy upgrades to its various cloud apps. And a single technology base would make training easier and allow his team to be more “nimble and agile” in deploying additional SAP cloud apps in the future.


SAP is no stranger to common software architectures; its NetWeaver platform forms the technical foundation on top of which several SAP business apps run.


A converged cloud architecture would ideally lead to a smoother user experience, said Vince Kellen, CIO of the University of Kentucky, who spends about $1.5 million a year on SAP’s financial and procurement apps, SAP’s HANA in-memory database software, and SuccessFactors. He’s evaluating SAP’s Enterprise Cloud suite, which includes cloud versions of SAP’s business apps and HANA software. If he chooses that platform, he’s going to need to be able to integrate data from SuccessFactors, as well as data from non-SAP applications, such as student information cloud apps he is mulling. “I want good interoperability,” said Mr. Kellen.


SAP spokesman Saswato Das declined to say what the company has in store for customers early next year. “We will lay out a roadmap through 2020 and that will be comprehensive,” he said.


2020 is a crucial target year for SAP. Mr. McDermott told Re/Code that SAP aims to be number one in cloud users and revenue by then. But to achieve it, SAP will have to go through rivals such as Oracle Corp. and Salesforce.com Inc.


Whatever SAP announces early next year, Holger Mueller, a Constellation Research analyst who tracks SAP, said customers will welcome a longer term strategy because it will allow them to align their purchasing decisions along that plan. He also said he will be paying attention to whether SAP sticks to its “Run Simple” mission, a pledge to reduce IT complexity, announced earlier this summer at a customer event. “It will be interesting to see how the new ‘simple’ message will find itself in the new plan, said Mr. Mueller. “Simple is not easy behind the scenes.”


SAP in October reported a 15% increase in third-quarter profit due to its cloud sales, but it reduced its full-year operating profit in anticipation of short-term pressures on margins and less upfront revenue, due to its increase in cloud sales.







Subribe Sap Feeds
 

Sample text

Sample Text

Sample Text